Denso Robotics Celebrates 50 Years, Opens Ohio Training Center

Source: Denso Robotics

Aug 07, 2017

Denso is celebrating 50 years of robotics, having been founded back in 1967. During its founding, robotics was relatively unknown and few knew what a vital role robots would play in the years to come.

Today, Denso provides robotics to global industries and it is the world's largest user of small assembly robots, from four-axis SCARA robots to five- and six-axis articulated units. More than 18,000 Denso small industrial robots are employed in the company's own manufacturing facilities, and more than 77,000 additional DENSO small industrial robots are used by other companies worldwide.

The company has also unveiled its latest sales, application and training Center, located 40 minutes northeast of Cincinnati in West Chester, Ohio.

According to Denso, developing advanced automation technologies, while offering customer education and support are what the facility is meant to accomplish.

At the facility, production operators, programmers and maintenance personnel are trained on today's robotic arms, controllers and applications.

Staffed with experts in their field, the center is designed to serve Denso Robotics' customers in the Midwest, East Coast and Southern regions of the country. It operates in conjunction with two similar centers in Long Beach, California and Maryville, Tennessee.

This professionally-developed facility expands Denso' customer support services, fulfilling the needs of end-users, approved distributors and system integrators alike. Training is designed to cover every base, including basic and advanced robot programming, operation, maintenance and ORiN programming language. Additional custom courses are offered to fit customers' special production and manufacturing needs.

All classrooms are equipped and allow education on a highly professional level. Students have access to all the latest Denso controllers, vision hardware, wireless infrastructure and work stations, along with dedicated, hands-on robots.

"Everything at the Ohio facility is geared to maximizing the usefulness of DENSO robot arms in multiple industries,” said Peter Cavallo, manager of the robotics sales department. “The center deliberately keeps class sizes small, with the ideal teacher-to-student ratio. The result is a deeper level of learning and product understanding."

Students can enhance the learning experience by participating in online video training and webcasts.

Customer support classes are also available through the facility's website, complete with everything from video content, FAQ pages and product information to white papers and regional access to customer service, repair and application support resources.

When industrial robot arms first appeared in the early 1960s, DENSO developed the technology and applied it to its manufacturing processes.

Denso Robotics offers a range of high-speed, high-precision 4-axis SCARA and 5- and 6-axis articulated industrial robots, for payloads up to 20 kg. Standard, dust- and mistproof, dust- and waterproof, cleanroom and aseptic models are available to accommodate many different applications. In addition to industrial robot arms, DENSO also offers programming software, controllers and teaching pendants.

During the "Swinging Sixties" decade, DENSO Robotics was developing a range of controllers, software and industrial robots that would change automation. By 1970, manufacturing and implementation of their first aluminum die-casting robot was well under way.

Denso was credited with the 4- and 6-axis mid-sized robots of the 1980s and advanced controllers of the 90s, up to the HS, HM and VS-series robots of the early 2000s. Since then, further development led to designs such as the RC7M and RC8 controllers, as well as the latest advanced VS-series pharmaceutical robots.

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