Pharmaceuticals in the Water; Don't Ask, Don't Tell

More evidence that the drug industry and EPA need to redefine acceptable emissions limits for APIs, collaborate on intelligent and cost effective detection and analytical methods and proactively address a controversial subject that will not go away.  It may take decades to come up with any definitive answers, but the time to get the word out on this is now.  (We plan to air a webcast on this topic next fall).  Click here for a recent article updating the Associated Press look at pharmaceutical ingredients in the municipal water supply.

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  • <p>There are two distinct issues and they have to be separated. Every article I have read combines the two issues as a result there is not direction and/or solution to the problem. Issues are as follows. 1) Pharmaceuticals in water due to humans discarding them. There are no laws to control these discharges. 2) Pharmaceuticals coming from the manufacturing plants. Regulatory bodies have guidelines and laws to control BOD (biological oxygen demand), COD (chemical oxygen demand), suspended and dissolved solids to certain levels. If the companies meet the applicable rules, there is no law that tells any company to control toxic chemicals to below certain level. Yes, we can analyze and talk about the toxicity of pharmaceuticals and their ill-effect on the eco-system and humans but there are no laws to control them. Talk is free but the walk costs money. Yes, the manufacturing process efficiencies need to be improved but when I can make my profit margin and meet the water discharge regulations, why would I spend money on something that is not going to give me any return. Laws of needs, demand, supply, conscience and economics come into play but the laws of economics dictate. Patancheru is there and not a whole lot can be done about it. </p>

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