BI, Eli Lilly Announce NDA Filing for Empagliflozin and Linagliptin Combo

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accepted the filing of the New Drug Application (NDA) for the investigational combination tablet of empagliflozin and linagliptin for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

If granted approval by the FDA, this combination will bring together, for the first time into one tablet, the distinct mechanisms of action of a sodium glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. SGLT2 inhibitors remove excess glucose through the urine by blocking glucose re-absorption in the kidney. DPP-4 inhibitors work by increasing hormones that stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin and stimulate the liver to produce less glucose.

"The FDA acceptance of our filing for the combination tablet of empagliflozin and linagliptin brings us closer to providing patients with type 2 diabetes a potential treatment option that lowers blood sugar through the dual mechanism of action of a DPP-4 inhibitor and an SGLT2 inhibitor," said Christophe Arbet-Engels, MD, PhD, vice president, metabolic-clinical development and medical affairs, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. "Adults living with type 2 diabetes often take more than one therapy to manage their condition, and we hope the combination of these two products will help them improve control of their blood sugar."

The filing follows the completion of a phase III clinical registration trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the empagliflozin/linagliptin combination compared to the individual components in adults with T2D. The Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly Diabetes alliance plans to present data from this study later this year.

Linagliptin, which is marketed as Tradjenta® (linagliptin) tablets in the U.S., is a once-daily, 5-mg tablet used along with diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with T2D. TRADJENTA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. TRADJENTA has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis.1

Read the full release

More News:

All news »

What are your comments?

You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here.

Comments

No one has commented on this page yet.

RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments